South Africa June 24, 2016

Cop Speaks Out About Dagga Legalisation, Gets Demoted

South African politics is a weird and not so wonderful thing. With riots and looting currently hitting the capital city over the political shenanigans of the ruling elite, another similar move in the Western Cape is likely to be overlooked among the trending pics of a burning Pretoria.

Deputy Police Commissioner, Jeremy Vearey, and Crime Intelligence boss, Peter Jacobs, have been abruptly removed from their posts and demoted to separate local policing clusters. Most noted for their work to “dislodge, disorganise and disrupt” gang commotion, Jeremy Vearey’s recent headline making views on the failure of the War on Drugs are not likely to have earned him any fans among the provincial and national powers who may already have a political bounty on him. “It’s no secret that Vearey has been rubbing several people up the wrong way. Continuously locking horns with the DA-led provincial government has not helped his cause either,” said one insider among other police members who are claiming that new provincial boss Lieutenant-General Khombinkosi Jula “did not want” Vearey as part of his team.

Word is that the new man in charge has bowed under political pressure, something that has also been picked up on by on the ground police officers, “People are strategically aligning themselves, and it is the fight against crime that will ultimately suffer.”
One of the communities who’ll also be feeling the brunt of this loss will be the anti-War on Drug lobby that saw a comrade in this seasoned cop who was not afraid to speak his mind on drug law reform.

Fortunately for Vearey and Jacobs, they have not been completely left out in the cold. The Police and Prisons Civil Rights Union (Popcru) is set to take the matter “all the way to court” and provincial secretary, Mncedisi Mbolekwa, has made their intentions crystal clear, “They are demoted for no good reason. We view this as unfair labour practice.”
“We are going to attack the employer. There is already a case involving a correctional services official which set a precedent in the Western Cape High Court.”
“An employer does have a right to move you from time to time but, by law, they must give reasons as to why a member is being moved from point A to point B. The members should also have been afforded 21 days, but they were informed last week and must start today. They had to be afforded an opportunity to explain their situations and state their case.”

The SAPS has however backed their decision and National spokeswoman Brigadier Mashadi Selepe stated,  “Deployment of senior managers and members of the service at all levels is processed with the objective of ensuring service delivery improvement balancing the needs of the organisation and the affected individuals. Other influences and/or pressure from any quarter is not a consideration. Redeployment of managers and employees cannot be construed as a demotion.”
Which, if you boil it all down, sounds a lot like just another Zuma’ism.

We don’t have to cast our minds that far back to the, now dead in the ANC trenches, Nhlanhla Nene and Desmond “Weekend Special” van Rooyen fiasco to hear the similarities of the same no fuck’s given attitude. Things are heating up as we enter election season and there are certain to be many more political casualties along the way.

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South Africa’s Finest Smoking Gear

  • Biggie

    I think this needs to be investigated by the Public Protector

  • tgif1
  • Bobby Greenhash

    This is fucking bullshit. When a member of our police services of this stature, is shuffled off to a dark corner because he is speaking the honest de facto truth that the War on drugs is a failure, this is how he is treated. Well guys, you have our full support from the Bobby Greenhash Foundation. Give those DA pencil neck dinosaurs big stick.

    • ex-smoker-2015

      advocates of legalizing dagga claim that the war on dagga is being lost anyway, so why not simply legalize dagga? Yet they actively combat the law and the police’s efforts to enforce laws against dagga. As in recent marches where they blantantly disregarded the law and smoked dagga in public. Their misinformation and propaganda campaigns encourage new users and make the work of the police and those that enforce the law extremely difficult. They are undermining with all their might the system they claim is failing.

  • ex-smoker-2015

    well, this sort of thing can happen when an individual takes it upon themselves to speak in advocation of legalizing cannabis, without following formal channels and procedures….

  • ex-smoker-2015

    Laws are made for a good reason. What is good for one or a group, the minority, cannot be said to be good for the whole of society, the majority. A person’s pleasure should not violate the rights of another or place them in a worse situation or in harm’s way, as would be the case if dagga were legalized.

    The final resort in the battle for legalization is for those who are for it to retreat to the last line of defence which is the allegation that laws against dagga are an infringement of a user’s human rights. They claim their freedom is threatened by the legal restrictions against dagga, and will stubbornly hold to this last, irrational line of defence when the holes in all other arguments have been exposed. Should theft be legalized because some like to steal? Is it an infringement of the thiefs human rights to have laws against stealing? The offense if different but the principle the same.

    There are victims of theft and those who would become victims to dagga if it were legalized.

    Society has an inherent right to ward off crimes against itself and does so through laws that are put in place against threats like marijuana. In such cases the rights of an individual or minority can be infringed upon to a reasonable extent with the safety of the majority in mind.

    • D Thomas

      Already there is growing actual recorded evidence for what happens when cannabis is legalized from Colorado and Washington. So far your view is unsupported. I do think we need to give them another 8 or so years to see what the impact will really be, but thus far it looks unlikely that it will have much of an affect on the daily lives of most people.

      • ex-smoker-2015

        yes, there is! and you won’t have to wait 8 years either 🙂

        read the 188 page report compiled by the Colorado State Health department that outlines the
        extremely negative results they have experienced since legalization.

        this document was published by about 100 or so people, nearly all of whom hold PHDs and live and work in Clorado

        check it out…….

        • D Thomas

          That report “doesn’t include new research on marijuana. Instead, it’s a review of what its authors call limited existing studies.” – a caveat written in the first article I found upon Googling it. See it does not include any “extremely negative results they have experienced since legalization” as you claimed, so I am afraid I will have to wait. 😉

          • ex-smoker-2015

            hey man, they are reporting on what has taken place in their hospitals etc. while they may refer to studies that is beside the point. a lot of what they report is first hand. Also, the studies they refer to are relevant. are you saying that now in the last couple of months, suddenly a whole body of studies have popped up that show that everything we know about dagga is false, and they had no access to this information at the time?

          • D Thomas

            Sorry, but it isn’t. In the past, because dagga was illegal in these places the most studies done were in order to prove that there was harm to justify the government’s position. Added to this because of the illegality there was probably a high level of dishonesty by those who (ab)used the plant in questionnaire based studies.

            Basing studies on hospital admissions leads to correlation/causation errors. Imagine if hospital admissions alone were used to study the usefulness of automobiles. The things would be banned in a heartbeat. Hospital admissions only give data at the points at which things go wrong with no way of showing what percentage of times this happens.

            Because Dagga was/is classified as a schedule 1 drug (a classification that specifically excludes allowences for research) it was near impossible for independent studies to be granted rights to study its effects. Now even though it is still a schedule 1 substance research can be legally conducted in the states where it is legal, like Washington or Colorado.

            Give it 10 years for real unbiased science to be done, peer reviewed, and replicated before adhering too strongly to a position, whatever that position may be.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            at last year’s CDA round table discussion on cannabis hosted in JHB, top medical professionals and bodies gave up to date findings on the harmful effects of the recreational use of cannabis. These findings and the evidence that supported them were recent and up to date,

            they echoed the very same findings of the report from colorado and they did not tailor their findings to suit some government led propaganda campaign as those in favour of cannabis legalization seem to claim (perhaps cannabis induced paranoia is at the root of the never ending fear of propaganda – although it does seem to include absolutely anything that contradicts theirs stance on cannabis, including sound evidence and findings.

            they showed up to date evidence as to the harmful affect that dagga has on people.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            please note that current findings were placed against past findings to show an increase in these areas, so it’s not all based on past studies, they are simply used to show that these things have incereased.

            and again, this is all really beside the point.

            too often this matter of legalized dagga gets caught up in irrelavent issues.

            you say we must wait and see what the results of legalized dagga are, so basically you say that hey, lets just legalize a narcotic and then wait and see what happens, which is of course very unwise. we already have much evidence from countries like holland and the UK that they are backtracking on their initial stance etc.

            but at the end of the day we ALREADY know what will happen. in South Africa, more than in any other country in the world, WE KNOW DAGGA, and we know what it does to people.

            We have seen with our very own eyes that dagga harms people, it’s witnessed in this country every day. Those who’s children and family members smoke dagga, who live in communities where dagga use is rife, or who have family members who’s minds have been destroyed through their use of dagga. We all know the truth about dagga.

            There is no need to look any further when it s already quite plain to see.
            Yet those in favour of legalization keep throwing nonsense arguments into the mix, in the desperate hope that something they say may actually be taken seriously and advance their agenda of having dagga legalized in this country.

            90% of what is said by those in favour of having dagga legalized could only be believed and taken seriously by someone who themselves is high most of the time (wait a minute, they are, so then it makes sense). The rest of the population who are sober, rational and who have first hand knowledge of the truth about dagga, will not fall for any of this nonsense.
            So then we come to the final resort. Human rights!

            Unfortunately, not allowing people to get high on their favourite drug is not an infringement of an individuals fundamental human rights. Here the leglizationists gain some small ground because it SOUNDS legitimate to some people (why not let them smoke if they want to it doesn’t affect my life). Until these people take a closer look, perhaps by reading something like the report by Colorado’s State Health department that outlines all the negative effects of legalized cannabis in their state as reported by about 100 people who live and work their and hold PHD’s, and then they say, hang on a minute, these people being allowed to get high and do as they please, actually WILL have a VERY negative impact on MY life.

            Yes, perhaps YOU want to smoke cannabis and not have to worry about being prosecuted for using your favourite drug and getting high. But the majority of the population does not smoke cannabis and would prefer that it is not legalized. So now you say that because we live in a democracy you should have the right to use drugs freely if you choose. However that is not how a democracy works.

            human rights in no way mean that each individual can do whatever they want, whenever they want. that is in fact anarchy and lawlessness.

            People fight for their right to use cannabis, often equating it with their right to the freedom of speech and thought. Yet cannabis clouds a person’s thoughts and affects their speech.
            Society has an inherent right to ward off crimes against itself and does so through laws that are put in place against threats like marijuana. In such cases the rights of an individual or minority can be infringed upon to a reasonable extent with the safety of the majority in mind.
            If the rights of a very small minority can supersede the wishes of the greater majority of society, for example. if cannabis is forced on the whole of our society because a very few want it that way, then we in fact have a dictatorship.

            We all know that dagga is harmful, we don’t even need to refer to studies or medical professionals to confirm what they see with their very own eyes every day. why look further than what is in front of our very own eyes every day.

          • D Thomas

            You sir clearly have a agenda. All I said was that we should wait 10 years for the real evidence to come in, the I explained clearly why the current evidence is flawed.
            Your response is a long winded rant invoking several logical fallacies, anecdotes, and a general disregard for scientific method. Let me guess, you probably also think evolution has no supporting evidence and that the earth is less than 10000 years old.
            It wouldn’t surprise me if you work for a drug cartel and see any mention that cannabis legalization should even be considered as a threat to your business’ profits.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            funny you should mention it…

            i was once a drug dealer 🙂 i also now regularly encounter MANY people who have been adversely affected by cannabis.

            that’s why I know what i speak about. For example, the false argument you guys have that to legalize dagga will keep people away from ‘dangerous drug dealers’ and keep dagga out of the hands of the kids and so on and so forth.

            so i have some good first-hand experience with dagga. that is why i say that i don’t need to refer to studies (that you probably read on Google or somewhere). I have seen enough with my own eyes, as have many others, to know the truth about dagga without the need to look any further than what i see right in front of my very own eyes.

            what you seem to fail to understand here is that people don’t have to go in search of studies to convince them of something they witness every day of their lives and with which they have much first-hand experience.

            it has been pointed out elsewhere that those in favour of legalization can only try to hide behind a defence made of a million (there seems to be more of these than grains of sand on the beach) peer reviewed studies (that they read SOMEWHERE) when faced with the truth about dagga.

            Ask the mother’s whose kids smoke dagga and who are no longer the kids they once knew, the wives whose husbands smoke dagga and won’t work or support the family, those who live in poorer communities where dagga abuse is rife, those whose family members and friends are now psychotic because of their cannabis use. They will tell you they know all about dagga and what it does to people, and they don’t need some peer reviewed study for what they say to be fact.

          • D Thomas

            And yes, as a supporter of gay marriage and women’s rights, I do believe that the rights of a smaller minority should supersede that of the majority, and in those regards our constitution agrees.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            the freedom to use a narcotic and get high is not a fundamental human right and cannot be equated with the issues you mention here.

            this is just another false argument. it’s not uncommon to see those in favor of legalization bringing up issues (like apartheid) which have absolutely no bearing on the legalization of cannabis whatsoever, in an effort to drum up public support and cloud the issue.

            What is under consideration is dagga, and is it harmful to people, and should we therefore consider legalizing it. That’s all.

            So these issues that you bring up here are irrelevant.

          • D Thomas

            Pot. Kettle. N word. Re clouding the issue.

          • D Thomas

            BTW nice copy and paste job from your post 25 days ago. Clearly your memory has been affected by your previous inability to moderate your intake. Lol, thanks for the laugh.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            is there anything wrong with copying an argument given in response somewhere else?

            i don’t think there is a rule against that?

            besides, what does it matter, if the point is valid.

          • D Thomas

            Only that I have already read it. So it comes across as you not engaging with the argument, just being that guy who thinks he can sway opinion by repeating the same stale thing over and over.

          • ex-smoker-2015

            its not stale if its the truth, it just remains the truth 🙂

  • ex-smoker-2015

    the police and the courts are in fact funded to deal with crime in ALL forms including the use and posession of drugs. that’s what they are there for.

    It is argued that continuing to arrest dagga users stops the police from making better use of the resources that this task requires. This has never actually been proven as a fact.

    Their have been documented cases where major crimes were drastically reduced simply through coming down strongly on ‘minor’ offences.

    are you aware of how many rape and murder offenders are under the influence of cannabis at their time of arrest.

  • ex-smoker-2015

    We have seen with our very own eyes that dagga harms people, it’s witnessed in this country every day. Those who’s children and family members smoke dagga, who live in communities where dagga use is rife, or who have family members who’s minds have been destroyed through their use of dagga. We all know the truth about dagga.

    There is no need to look any further when it s already quite plain to see.

    Yet those in favour of legalization keep throwing nonsense arguments into the mix, in the desperate hope that something they say may actually be taken seriously and advance their agenda of having dagga legalized in this country.
    90% of what is said by those in favour of having dagga legalized could only be believed and taken seriously by someone who themselves is high most of the time (wait a minute, they are, so then it makes sense). The rest of the population who are sober, rational and who have first hand knowledge of the truth about dagga, will not fall for any of this nonsense.

    So then we come to the final resort. Human rights!

    Unfortunately, not allowing people to get high on their favourite drug is not an infringement of an individuals fundamental human rights. Here the leglizationists gain some small ground because it SOUNDS legitimate to some people (why not let them smoke if they want to it doesn’t affect my life). Until these people take a closer look, perhaps by reading something like the report by Colorado’s State Health department that outlines all the negative effects of legalized cannabis in their state as reported by about 100 people who live and work their and hold PHD’s, and then they say, hang on a minute, these people being allowed to get high and do as they please, actually WILL have a VERY negative impact on MY life.

    Yes, perhaps YOU want to smoke cannabis and not have to worry about being prosecuted for using your favourite drug and getting high. But the majority of the population does not smoke cannabis and would prefer that it is not legalized. So now you say that because we live in a democracy you should have the right to use drugs freely if you choose. However that is not how a democracy works.

    human rights in no way mean that each individual can do whatever they want, whenever they want. that is in fact anarchy and lawlessness.

    People fight for their right to use cannabis, often equating it with their right to the freedom of speech and thought. Yet cannabis clouds a person’s thoughts and affects their speech.

    Society has an inherent right to ward off crimes against itself and does so through laws that are put in place against threats like marijuana. In such cases the rights of an individual or minority can be infringed upon to a reasonable extent with the safety of the majority in mind.

    If the rights of a very small minority can supersede the wishes of the greater majority of society, for example. if cannabis is forced on the whole of our society because a very few want it that way, then we in fact have a dictatorship.

    We all know that dagga is harmful, we don’t even need to refer to studies or medical professionals to confirm what they see with their very own eyes every day. why look further than what is in front of our very own eyes every day.