Culture February 25, 2013

Does the ACDP support organized crime?

Although our mainstream leaders seem unwilling to enter the dagga debate, the African Christian Democratic Party has added its voice regarding the discussion.

“We are concerned that the serious problems facing our country due to [the] abuse of alcohol and illegal drugs will be obscured by ‘red-herrings’ like debates on legalising dagga” is what African Christian Democratic Party MP Cheryllyn Dudley has had to say, and we should be asking ourselves, why would the ACDP at the very least not support a debate on the matter of dagga legalisation?

There is a moral blind spot which Cheryllyn Dudley, and many others like her, refuse to turn their gaze towards. In their world, the prohibition of cannabis is without cost or consequence. To them it is just another part of their self-proclaimed quests to rid the world of all recreational drugs, even though their religion condones the most globally destructive drug of them all… alcohol. There is no arguing that our country has many issues to deal with regarding substance abuse, but why then does the ACDP insist that the dagga debate is a ‘red herring’ when a more liberal law would most likely result in lower use?

It is one thing to display faith as part of one’s a religion; it is a completely different thing to apply this same principle of faith to a cannabis law which exacerbates just about every problem that it failingly attempts to solve. You name it… exposure to hard drugs, youth use, organised crime and so on, it makes them all worse. Yet here we have another political party sitting atop its high horse wanting to make a difference by continuing to apply a law that is at the root of the very issues that they are trying to combat. Perhaps if they weren’t so busy opposing the dagga debate, and actually took the time to listen to what is being said, they would realise that we all want the same thing: Less harm from cannabis use.

The solution however lies not in fiercely enforcing an archaic law which makes criminals of otherwise innocent people, gives all the power and control to drug dealers, fuels organised crime and is the gateway to hard drugs. When organisations such as the ACDP choose to ignore the multitude of evidence and international cries for a change in the approach to cannabis users, it demonstrates that they have no actual intention to make a change for the better, but will instead play armchair referee in a matter that is ruining and costing lives every day.

It is doubtful that we will see anything other than the usual repetition of anti-cannabis studies and a pinch of anecdotal evidence from the ACDP. What we will certainly see from them though is a lack of any substantiation as to what potential health risk/s cannabis causes, or why we should still be shackled to a failed law that has had its time, a law that ironically detracts resources away from addressing “the serious problems facing our country”.

The time for political parties to feign ignorance is fast passing us by. Cannabis prohibition costs us millions, ruins the lives of millions and puts millions into the pockets of criminals. So why then would a political party with such righteous intentions continue to support a law that undoubtedly supports organised crime and makes us continue to foot the bill no matter how often or badly this law fails?

But then again, what could we expect from a homophobic political party which was “the only party to vote against the adoption of the final version of the South African Constitution”.

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  • Teddy

    The ignorance is outstanding in religion and politics, which revolves around profit. Why do we even listen to these people? If they claim change we would have seen it, to bad we are the change. 🙂

  • TheBeard

    Any chance you have contact details for Cheryllyn Dudley? Would love to mail her myself on this topic – the more they know they are opposing something which has solid rational and logic behind it the better IMO

  • SonOfScotland

    I think Legalizing would contribute to the overall revenue of organised crime.

  • SonOfScotland

    Haha real gangsters run the world.

    But on a more serious note, dealers who are feeding themselves and their families will be left without a means to provide for themselves. Where do they go? They have a skill set and understanding of the narcotics trade, wouldn’t they have to trade in something else now?

    Dealing in cannabis is safer than dealing in other substances for a number of reasons. A lot of police don’t consider it “Hot shit”, your clientele aren’t junkies, if you were a sensitive dealer perhaps you sleep better at night knowing it’s “Just weed” and not meth.

    From my experience a lot of guys are going to have to start dealing in harder things. Take away the cannabis dealers and we’ll have more cocaine,meth and heroin dealers. If these guys change their industry specialization they’ll start crowding those that were before them.

    Territory disputes will follow.

  • TreeSpirit

    @SonOfScotland
    Perhaps, if like myself you consider the ANC government to be the biggest organised crime syndicate in the country. Can you just imagine the potential for corruption that a cannabis industry worth billions would offer?
    On a serious note though, would you mind explaining to us why you think that the profits of organised crime would increase if the option to have a regulated, taxable industry existed?
    EDIT: Ah my bad, explanation already given. And spot on with that deduction TheBeard!

  • hippo for 20ing

    sos you thinking very short term. Growing and selling weed is one thing but coke and meth that’s a diff ball game all together, if we look at the facts, the use of cannabis decreased almost overnight when cannabis is legalized FACT. that’s thinking short term and these drug dealers will find a diff job or will slot into a new and upcoming legal industry where them and their families can benefit from things like pension fund, health care and best of all taxation! and have the opportunity to start up their own business and contribute to the economic welfare of their own community. think big sos what about the hundreds of impoverished farmers living bellow the bread line in the transkei that are working their buts off trying to afford school shoes for their children, now they are no longer criminals now they can develop their farming techniques with the help of government outreach programs and produce better produce at a far better price than the R1/g but rather produce for R15/g which will help them and their impoverished communities.

  • TreeSpirit

    I firmly believe that the majority of people who use cannabis would prefer to either grow it themselves or be able to buy it from a fully licensed, government sanctioned commercial distribution point. Most people would usually opt for buying legal properly labelled cannabis over black market cannabis as long as the government ensured that the product was A) of the highest standards of quality and B) kept the prices low enough to outcompete those of the black market.
    Simple economics.

  • As a person who has family members who have had their lives ruined, and they started with Dagga, and then moved on to other drugs when it no longer satisfied the high hunger I can in no way endorse the move to make it legal. I have seen peoples lives ruined by it. I toyed with it in my youth and I know that it made me not care about stuff I needed to, as a result, I failed even my home language and had to repeat a year at school. As someone who has a masters degree in Molecular Biology, I am in no way stupid. So don’t try blame that. After I got put on probation at school (for taking space cakes at school), and decided to stop all together as my life was going downward, I found I started to care about the things that mattered again. I vowed I would never touch the stuff again. All the friends I used to smoke with, have messed lives, barring one.

    Legalizing something doesn’t make it right.

    You have to consider why Amsterdam are reversing a lot of their laws on legal cannabis?

    I support the ACDP on this.

    So to me, this is just a bunch of stoners trying get a legal way to smoke pot all day.

  • hippo for 20ing

    when i was a teen it was much easier for me to get hold of cannabis than it was for me to get alcohol. cannabis was advertised to me while it is illegal to advertise alcohol to a minor!

  • TreeSpirit

    “So to me, this is just a bunch of stoners trying get a legal way to smoke pot all day.”

    So what if it is Sarah? Prohibitionists need to quit trying to dictate to others what they can and cannot put into their sovereign bodies. These people are not causing harm to anyone else and it is their choice to use it at the end of the day not yours. As with alcohol and tobacco and any other drug there is absolutely nothing moralistic about using cannabis. No one here is trying to force you or anyone else to use cannabis so please kindly reciprocate the gesture.

    Why aren’t people banned from using any other species of plant besides cannabis? What about the thousands of plants which are lethally toxic to humans like hemlock, oleander, monkshood, brugmansia and castor oil plant? These plants are deadly poisonous and are but a few examples of many out there. Why isn’t the government doing anything to protect its citizens from these plants which are responsible for many fatal poisonings each year? Cannabis on the other hand is not responsible for one single death from overdose in thousands of years. This is an example of just how blatantly hypocritical the laws against cannabis are.

  • hippo for 20ing

    nice post joe fish agree completely, some people just can’t handle their stuff but 3000BC would make it over 5000 years

  • Bananarama

    usertest1 said:
    As a person who has family members who have had their lives ruined, and they started with Dagga, and then moved on to other drugs when it no longer satisfied the high hunger I can in no way endorse the move to make it legal. I have seen peoples lives ruined by it. I toyed with it in my youth and I know that it made me not care about stuff I needed to, as a result, I failed even my home language and had to repeat a year at school. As someone who has a masters degree in Molecular Biology, I am in no way stupid. So don’t try blame that. After I got put on probation at school (for taking space cakes at school), and decided to stop all together as my life was going downward, I found I started to care about the things that mattered again. I vowed I would never touch the stuff again. All the friends I used to smoke with, have messed lives, barring one.

    Legalizing something doesn’t make it right.

    You have to consider why Amsterdam are reversing a lot of their laws on legal cannabis?

    I support the ACDP on this.

    So to me, this is just a bunch of stoners trying get a legal way to smoke pot all day.

    Just two things.
    Your family started on alcohol and/or cigarettes, not weed. I am not assuming. You know as well as I do that this is a fact. Blaming marijuana for their behaviour is pointless. There is some background information (family/social strife) you are not divulging as it does not suit your agenda.

    Amsterdam have been reversing all the laws they tried to make (due to US influence I would imagine) as they realised it is quite bad for their society and counter productive.

  • benjaminsa

    Re: Sarah

    Thank you for having the courage to post on a pro legalisation website, your objection is the typical first reaction most people have when they consider the issue. But what about all the harm?

    Here is the problem though: everything you and your family went and are going through happened when drugs where illegal, in fact your family was getting unadulterated unregulated street drugs, without recourse to any sort of treatment options. Keeping drugs illegal, doesn’t prevent the harm that happened to you, it amplifies it, this is not just an opinion or vague theory, but the conclusion of the vast majority of social scientists who have studied this. I am truly sorry for what happened to you and your family, we should be doing everything we can to prevent it happening to other people, and one of the ways to do that is to legalise and exercise at least some control over these substances. Which are currently being controlled and regulated by criminal gangs.

  • jywietmos

    in hindsight, fighting for legalization will seem like buying into the notion that one needed permission to exercise a birthright…

  • The Organic Militia

    Free the weed.

  • Teddy

    After reading this article. I dont know if the chick is stupid or ignorant. There has been countless studies done to prove how positive weed is and politicians turned a blind eye to the facts. Why do we even have to take these people into consideration and serious if they cant even keep up to date.

    http://gatewaynews.co.za/2013/02/28/legalising-dagga-will-worsen-sa-drug-problem-acdp/

  • Teddy
  • I just don’t know why allegedly ‘religious’ people can’t mind their own business and just let us infidels go to Hell with our dagga. This woman has the freedom to practise her religion so why can’t we have the freedom to partake in dagga without her shoving her morals in our faces??
    Religious folks are turning out to be the most INTOLERANT people on the planet. Woman, please keep your sermons in church where they belong!!

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